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Why AMP Still Matters in 2019

Mobile browsing has become the primary way most people use the internet. As such, any developer who’s not taking a mobile-first approach is likely going to let their clients down. Fortunately, if you’re new to mobile-first development, there are plenty of easy solutions you can put in place. One of...

Why Your Business Should Be Using Instagram Shoppable Posts

Shoppable posts are Instagram’s next big step in becoming a more business-friendly platform. Thanks to the new feature, Instagram users can complete their buying journey, from discovery to checkout, without ever leaving the Instagram app. And with 80% of Instagram’s 800 million users already following an “active shopping business” account (and 200 million users visiting...

Amazon debuts Showroom, a visual shopping experience for home furnishings

Amazon is venturing further into home furnishings with the debut of Amazon Showroom, a visual design tool that allows you to place furniture into a virtual living room, customize the décor, then shop the look. The retailer didn’t formally announce the launch of Amazon Showroom, but a spokesperson confirmed it’s...

WordPress.com Launches New “Do Anything” Marketing Campaign

WordPress.com is kicking off 2019 with a new national marketing campaign that features 14 entrepreneurs, writers, and non-profit organizations who are using the platform to make a big difference for their communities. The campaign is focused around the question: “What Would You Do If You Could Do Anything?” WordPress.com...

Why You Should Be Using Supported PHP Versions

PHP 5.6 and PHP 7.0 End of Life As of December 3rd, 2018, PHP 7.0 reached its end of life. This means it no longer has security support and could be exposed to unpatched security vulnerabilities. Following suit, as of December 31st, 2018, PHP 5.6 also reached its end...

I spent sometime this morning helping a client to simplify some of their admin by hooking up the contact form on their website to automatically update new contact form submission information on a Google Sheet for them to manage it more simply.

https://www.google.com/sheets/about/

If you haven’t used Google Sheets before then you should, it offers a great way for people to collabourate on data over the Internet, particularly if you work remotely too.

 

 

https://wordpress.org/plugins/cf7-to-zapier/

I made use of this WordPress plugin to link the clients Contact 7 enquiry form to Zapier which then enables it to automatically update the Google Spread sheet.

 

 

https://zapier.com/

Zapier allows you create what they call “Zaps” which work on a trigger such as a “Web Hook” (A post or request to a URL) to carry out an action, which can be something like creating a row of posted data on a specific Google Sheet (they support over 500+ apps!), and makes use of a template you define to insert data into the correct columns on the sheet.

 

The whole process is fairly painless, you click a “Make Zap” button after you setup your account, and follow a wizard which helps you setup you “Zap”, asking for the trigger type, the action, and pulling in data from a sample post to then help create the template, taking you step by step through the process in an easy way to understand to help you get up and running!

Article over at MSN this morning highlighted the confusion over GPDR and how businesses should handle it.

The vast majority of emails flooding inboxes across Europe from companies asking for consent to keep recipients on their mailing list are unnecessary and some may be illegal, privacy experts have said, as new rules over data privacy come into force at the end of this week.

 

Many companies, acting based on poor legal advice, a fear of fines of up to €20m (£17.5m) and a lack of good examples to follow, have taken what they see as the safest option for hewing to the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR): asking customers to renew their consent for marketing communications and data processing.

 

“Businesses are not required to automatically ‘repaper’ or refresh all existing 1998 Act consents in preparation for the GDPR,” Vitale said. “The first question to ask is: which of the six legal grounds under the GDPR should you rely on to process personal data? Consent is only one ground. The others are contract, legal obligation, vital interests, public interest and legitimate interests.

 

“Even if you are relying on consent, that still does not mean you have to ask for consent again. Recital 171 of the GDPR makes clear you can continue to rely on any existing consent that was given in line with the GDPR requirements, and there’s no need to seek fresh consent. Just make sure that your consent met the GDPR standard and that consents are properly documented.”

 

In other words, if the business had consent to communicate with you before GDPR, that consent probably carries over, and even if it doesn’t carry over, there are five other reasons a company can cite for continuing to process data.

 

What’s more, Vitale said, if the business really does lack the necessary consent to communicate with you, it probably lacks the consent even to email to ask you to give it that consent.

“In many cases the sender will be breaching another set of regulations, the Privacy and Electronic Communications Regulations, which makes it an offence to email someone to ask them for consent to send them marketing by email.”

 

The lack of understanding around when and why consent is needed under GDPR has prompted the Information Commissioner’s Office to try to resolve some of the “myths” of GDPR.

 

“We’ve heard stories of email inboxes bursting with long emails from organisations asking people if they’re still happy to hear from them,” Steve Wood, the deputy information commissioner, wrote in guidance for businesses. “So think about whether you actually need to refresh consent before you send that email, and don’t forget to put in place mechanisms for people to withdraw their consent easily.”

 

Like Vitale, Wood emphasised that asking for marketing consent from people who had not given it initially could be illegal. “It’s also important to remember that in some cases it may not be appropriate to seek fresh consent if you are unsure how you collected the contact information in the first place, and the consent would not have met the standard under our existing Data Protection Act,” he said.

Lukasz Olejnik, a privacy researcher and consultant, said part of the problem was that many businesses were not in the habit of recording when and how they received the initial consent to contact customers, instead just storing vast databases of email addresses. “Some companies may simply be unable to demonstrate that they have consents, either because they don’t or they do not have a trace of it.

 

“This fact – that some companies simply never had consents or are unable to demonstrate having consents – is sometimes discussed among both policymakers and consultants. There are also discussions over companies not respecting even the existing data privacy regulations.”

 

Paul Jordan, the Europe managing director of the International Association of Privacy Professionals, offered one silver lining. “I think it’s quite clear that a number of companies won’t be ready [for GDPR], but if they can demonstrate they have been planning appropriately [then regulators will give them] a certain leeway.”

I think its important to note from this that Consent is only one ground. The others are contract, legal obligation, vital interests, public interest and legitimate interests which many people seem to be unware of, and also that if the business had consent to communicate with you before GDPR, that consent probably carries over, and even if it doesn’t carry over, there are five other reasons a company can cite for continuing to process data, you can continue to rely on any existing consent that was given in line with the GDPR requirements, and there’s no need to seek fresh consent which is worth thinking about when deciding what action to take.

Its quite clear that you need to think careful and plan what needs to be in place for your business when deciding what action to take over this, Simply spamming existing marketing mailing lists asking for repeat consent may not be the right way forward or even necessary if you have already requested consent properly previously, if it was in-line with the GPDR requirements and as long as you kept good records of it.

View more over at MSN.com